Friday, February 02, 2018

Season Recap: Luis Garcia

Let's talk about Luis Garcia. The big right-hander pitched in 66 games for the Phillies, tossing 71 effective innings. He's had an interesting career since the Phillies signed in 2010.

In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at relief pitcher Michael Saunders. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.

Garcia has pitched in 192 games for the Phillies. If he lasts another full season in Philly, he'll likely end up pitching in more games than Larry Anderson and Brad Lidge. He appeared in 72 games two years ago, but was limited to just 17 in 2016.

Garcia's numbers are pretty impressive. In 198 innings, he's given up just 14 home runs while allowing 8.8 hits per nine. The big issue is that he walks way too many batters, about 4.8 per game. That number fell to 3.3 last season. If he can repeat that success, he'll be valuable again in 2018.

Season Recap: Michael Saunders

Michael Saunders was supposed to stabilize the lineup. Instead, he was one of the biggest free agent busts in recent Phillies seasons. And that says something.

In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at relief pitcher Andrew Knapp. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.

Saunders was coming off of an All Star season and hit .202/.256/.344. Look at those numbers. They are awful.

Season Recap: Andrew Knapp

Who will catch the most games for the Phillies in 2018? There's little doubt that Jorge Alfaro is the most talented of the three likely catchers. We also know that Cameron Rupp is the most experienced catcher. But I'd argue there's a good chance Andrew Knapp gets the most starts in 2018.

Look, Alfaro drips talent, but he's still incredibly raw behind the plate. Rupp has been a solid catcher, but he's averaged 91 games caught the past three seasons and he seemed to take a slight step back in 2017. So it stands to reason that Knapp could, if an injury occurs and the Phillies are playing well, get a good stretch of playing time. So let's look at what he did in his rookie season.

In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at relief pitcher Edubray Ramos. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.

Knapp played in 56 games, slashing a respectable .257/.368/.368/.735. In his previous three minor league seasons he had a .385, .375, .330 on-base percentage. That's a valuable took. He also has a solid track record with extra base hits, but didn't really drive the ball in his rookie season. He hit just eight doubles, a triple and three home runs during the year. Defensively, he gave you basically what you expect from a rookie catcher.

Season Recap: Edubray Ramos

Edubray Ramos was a solid bullpen piece in 2017. Oh, his 4.21 ERA wasn't fantastic. But his other numbers belied a much better season.

In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at first baseman Brock Stassi. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.

Ramos had a 2.92 FIP, allowed just four home runs in 57 innings, struck out more than 11 batters per nine innings and, despite a high walk rate per nine innings, a huge discrepancy between his strikeout rate and walk rate.

Ramos struggled through a brutal stretch in July, giving up nine of the 29 runs he gave up all season in a span of just eight days. If you take away that week, he had a 3.20 ERA on the season. 

Expect a third straight solid season from Ramos in 2018, particularly since the Phillies should have a deeper pen that will put him in lower leverage situations. 

Season Recap: Brock Stassi


I first saw Brock Stassi in person at spring training two years ago. He seemed to mash everything in sight. Then he made the Phillies last season and it seemed like he was a Cinderella story.

In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at relief pitcher Rhys Hoskins. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.
Sadly Midnight arrived too early. The 27-year-old hit just .167/.278/.295 in 90 sporadic plate appearances. 

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Season Recap: Rhys Hoskins

Rhys Hoskins was a freak. He arrived on August 10th and destroyed everything thrown his way for two months.

In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at relief pitcher Pat Neshak. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.

Hoskins played well enough that MLB Network's hosts had him as a top 10 left fielder today. In 212 plate appearances, he bashed 18 home runs, drove in 48 runs and batted .259/.396/.618. He had a .416 WOBA. That he crushed the ball is something everyone knows.

When you dig in to his minor league numbers, you see some very promising trends. Over the past three years, his walk rate went from 10.5 to 12.1 to 13.5 percent. That's a track record of knowing the strike zone. And his knowledge is improving.

Hoskins was a huge highlight of the Phillies season and fans are ready for an encore in 2018.


Wednesday, January 03, 2018

Season recap: Pat Neshek

I don't think fans realize how much of a stud Pat Neshek was last season. In 43 games, he had a 2.1 bWAR. Because it's a cumulative stat, it's hard for a relief pitcher - particularly in the modern game - to get that high of a WAR number.
Consider these are the highest career WAR of all time for relief pitchers.

Dennis Eckersley - 63.0
Mariano Rivera - 57.1
Hoyt Wilhelm - 47.3
Rich Gossage - 42.0
Tom Gordon - 35.3

In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at outfielder Cam Perkins. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.

So, who was the last Phillies relief pitcher to accumulate 2.1 WAR in a season. 
Was it Hector Neris, who pitched in 80 games in 2016?
Was it fireballer Ken Giles in 2015?
No and no. It was Jonathan Papelbon, who had 2.8 WAR in 2014. But he was a closer. What about a non-closing relief pitcher.
Ryan Madsen had to have pulled it off in 2008, right? J.C. Romero? No and no. You have to go all the way back to Geoff Geary's efficient 2007 campaign. Did you forget about that? When he tossed 91 innings, allowing just 6 home runs and 20 walks.

Yeah, Neshek was pretty special.
The good news is he's back. And he wasn't just good last season. In the past six seasons, he has a 2.50 ERA, a 3.23 FIP, a .971 WHIP and a 4.68 strikeout to walk ratio.

Season recap: Cam Perkins

Cam Perkins hit .182/.237/.273/.510 with some moderate success defensively. He will not return.
In the coming days, we're going to recap every player who spent a part of  2017 with the Philadelphia Phillies. The previous post looked at outfielder Hyun Soo Kim. We even have a landing post with a link to each player's season.
Perkins had been a fringy Phillies Prospect for several seasons. His tools will give him a chance as a fourth outfielder in the big leagues for some time. But don't expect to regret him being let go.